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  • The Chopping Blog

My Bloody Valentine: It's Blood Orange Season

Erica F
Posted by Erica F on Feb 3, 2016

Blood oranges are one of my favorite fruits. Their sweet and tangy flesh yields a distinctly vibrant juice and they are a great addition to salads, salsas and your snack drawer!

bloodoranges.jpgI went home to Los Angeles a few weeks ago and noticed that my blood orange tree was just dripping with fruit. I ate as many as I could while I was there, enjoying the scent of warm weather and sunshine with every bite, but I desperately wanted to capture some of that citrusy magic to bring back to my friends snowed in Chicago! What better way to lock that sunshine up in a jar than some blood orange marmalade? Of course I’ve never made marmalade before, but I sure have eaten a lot of it. So, with a little help from the internet, I give you my Really Easy Blood Orange Marmalade recipe.

Blood Orange Marmalade

1 lb blood oranges (approximately 4-5 tennis ball sized oranges)

Zest and juice of 1 lemon

2 ½ cups granulated sugar

4 cups water

Canning Equipment: 6 or 8-ounce canning jars with rings and lids (I used a few different sizes because they were cute), tongs, ladle, canning funnel (I couldn’t find mine, so just used a spoon), large pot, rack that fits inside the pot (I just used a folded tea towel to keep the jars off of the bottom of the pot), and a deep fry or candy thermometer.

bloodorangemisenplace.jpg1. Wash oranges and lemon thoroughly. Cut oranges into ⅛-inch slices on a mandoline. Using a sharp knife or kitchen shears, cut slices in half or quarters. Place orange slices into a medium-sized stainless steel pot. Add lemon zest, lemon juice and water and bring to a boil over high heat.

bloodorangegrater.jpg2. Once boiling, reduce heat to a rapid simmer and cook, stirring frequently, until fruit is soft.

bloodorangecook.jpg3. While the fruit is cooking, place a small plate in the freezer. You will use this later to test you marmalade for doneness.

4. Now prepare your jars by placing jars, lids, rings, a large spoon and your tongs into a large pot of boiling water. Water should cover the jar by at least 1 inch. Boil for 10 minutes. Once boiled, turn the heat off and leave everything submerged in the pot until the marmalade is ready.

jars.jpg5. Return to your marmalade. Raise the heat to return fruit to a full boil. Add sugar and stir fruit continuously until it reaches 222 degrees Fahrenheit on a deep fry or candy thermometer.

bloodorangethermometer.jpg6. To test the doneness of your marmalade, remove your plate from the freezer and drop a teaspoon of your fruit mixture on the plate. Hold the plate up. The mixture should be a soft gel that moves slightly, but does not run.

bloodorangeplate.jpg7. Now it’s time to fill your jars. Using tongs, remove jars, rings a lids from pot and place on a clean tea towel.

jarpickup.jpgjarslaidout.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. Using your sterilized spoon, fill jars to just below the threads until all your fruit has been used. Note that the amount may vary and any extra can be eaten of the spot or stored covered in the refrigerator. Wipe the rims and threads of each jar with a damp paper towel and top with lid and ring. Screw ring on firmly and return jar to pot with boiling water. Be sure you’ve placed a rack or folded towel on the bottom of the pot to keep the jars off the bottom. Water should cover jars by an inch. Boil for 10 minutes to seal.

bloodorangejars.jpgjarscanning.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. Remove jars from pot and place in a cool dry place for 24 hours. Listen for a loud pop. That’s the sound of your jars sealing! Marmalade will keep unopened for 6 months. Store in the refrigerator once opened.

jarsfinished.jpgtoast-1.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more on preserving fruits and veggies, see some of The Chopping Block's other posts on canning and canning savory pepper jelly. Our canning classes will return this spring and summer.

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Recipe help from:

Topics: blood orange, citrus, canning

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